Kristersson given the task of forming government

The negotiations among the parties - the Moderates, the Christian Democrats, the Liberals and the Sweden Democrats that could become the base for Sweden's next coalition government - "are going well but may take a few weeks," was Kristersson's comment after meeting with the Speaker of the Riksdag.  

  • Ulf Kristersson's government base with the Moderates, the Christian Democrats, the Liberals together with the Sweden Democrats won the election with 176 seats against Magdalena Andersson's government base with the Social Democrats, the Left Party, the Green Party and the Center Party which received 173 seats.
  • Moderate leader Ulf Kristersson has now been given the task of investigating the possibilities of forming a government according to the Speaker of the Riksdag, Andreas Norlén. During the first Speaker's discussions, Andreas Norlén spoke privately with all party leaders except Magdalena Andersson to come up with proposals for a new prime minister. "As a result of today's conversation with the party leaders, I have decided to give Ulf Kristersson the task of probing for a government that can be tolerated by the Riksdag." The government negotiations are going well but may take a few weeks, was Kristersson's comment after the meeting. By September 25 at the latest, Kristersson will hold a press conference about how the work is going. The Sweden Democrats' Jimmie Åkesson has said he wants to be part of a government. "My starting point is still that Sweden would feel good about a majority government," he said after his conversation with the speaker. The Christian Democrats' Ebba Busch commented after her conversation with the speaker that "there are good and constructive talks between the four parties." The Liberals' leader Johan Pehrson still hopes to be included in a government, while he believes that the Sweden Democrats should not be included in it. "We have been clear that we would like to find solutions, not deadlocks, but believe that SD should not be part of the government." He commented at the same time after a conversation with the speaker that the four parties have constructive talks.

  • Moderate leader and possible new Prime Minister in Sweden Ulf Kristersson. Photo: Axel Adolfsson
  • Update from Wednesday, Sept. 14
    Kristersson declares victory in the 2022 Swedish election
    The Moderate (M) party leader Ulf Kristersson is likely Sweden's next prime minister and, in that case, will be the one tasked with forming a new government. On the evening of September 14, Swedish time, all the votes were finally counted and the election results were published: Ulf Kristersson's government base with the Moderates, the Christian Democrats, the Liberals together with the Sweden Democrats won the election with 176 seats against Magdalena Andersson's government base with the Social Democrats, the Left Party, the Green Party and the Center Party which received 173 seats.
    The major policy areas that the new government will focus on are according to the moderates
    • to bring Sweden into NATO and lead the Swedish EU presidency in 2023
    • to take responsibility for the country's economy and household finances in a demanding time.
    • to bring about the political reforms required to stop the shootings, end the energy crisis and break the exclusion characterized by excessive unemployment and high dependency on benefits.
    The moderates went to the polls to form a right-leaning conservative government in cooperation with the Sweden Democrats, and the parties started talks immediately after election day. Exactly which parties will form part of a government is still unclear, but in several areas M, KD, SD and L have already laid the foundations for a new policy. This includes, among other things, tougher measures against criminals, stricter migration policy, the introduction of a welfare reform and switching to a more nuclear-friendly energy policy. There are some issues that could cause trouble when Kristersson is now to form a government. The Liberals with 4.6% of votes have already issued demands for cabinet posts but at the same time do not want the Sweden Democrats, who have become Sweden's second largest party, to sit in the same government. SD has dropped the demand for a Swedish exit from the EU but still advocates that the union's power over the member states be limited, while the Moderates and Liberals are pro-EU parties. The issue of Sweden's foreign aid will also be a difficult issue to resolve—M and SD want the aid to be reduced, while KD and L support the current goal that one percent of gross national income (GNI) should be set aside for aid. It is also likely that even if the parties have agreed on guidelines and certain proposals with regard to migration, SD probably wants to go much further and advocates e.g. that Sweden's right to asylum is lowered to the EU's minimum level.